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EvenifYoureanAdultYouCanStillHaveaStraighterSmile

As you get older, you may find yourself regretting things from your youth: getting that tattoo with your (ex) lover's name; giving up on piano lessons; or, not investing in that fledgling, little company called Facebook. Here's another thing you might regret: Not having your crooked smile straightened when you were a teenager.

We can't advise you on your other life issues, but we can on the latter—stop regretting your less than perfect smile and take action, because you still can! Even several years removed from adolescence you can still straighten your smile. Age makes no difference: as long as you and your mouth are relatively healthy, you can undergo bite correction even late in life. And, you'll be joining the current 1 in 5 orthodontic patients who are adults.

Straightening your teeth—what some call "the original smile makeover"—can radically transform your appearance and boost your self-confidence. But orthodontic treatment could also boost your dental health: Misaligned teeth are harder to keep clean, so realigning them reduces your risk for dental disease.

You're sold…but, one thing may still hold you back: you're not crazy about how you, a grown adult, might look in braces. You may, however, have a more attractive option with clear aligners.

Clear aligners are a series of clear plastic mouth trays computer-generated from measurements of your teeth and jaws. During treatment, you'll wear each tray for about two weeks before changing to the next one in the sequence. The dimensions on each tray vary slightly so that they move your teeth gradually, just like braces.

Because they're nearly invisible, they don't stand out like braces. And unlike braces, you can also remove them for meals, oral hygiene, or special occasions (although to be effective, you'll need to wear them most of the time).

If you'd like to know more, visit your orthodontist for a complete exam and consultation. After reviewing your options, you may decide to bid adieu to at least one life regret—and get the perfect smile you've always wanted.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatments, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
March 25, 2022
Category: Oral Health
3ReasonstoScheduleRegularDentalHygieneVisits

It's a common fantasy to imagine you're the main squeeze of one of the world's most desirable humans, but it was real life for Priscilla Wagner Beaulieu. In the late 1960s she was married briefly to heartthrob Elvis Presley. Unfortunately, sex symbols often remain so even after they put a ring on it. In a recent People interview, Priscilla revealed how she always felt uneasy leaving Elvis alone with anyone—even going so far as to accompany him while he was having his teeth cleaned.

Fortunately (or unfortunately, depending on your point of view), most of us don't need a chaperone during our six-month dental hygiene visit. We might, however, encounter a different problem: finding time for a cleaning amidst a hectic work and family schedule. And because nothing looks or feels wrong inside the mouth, many justify putting it off to a more convenient time.

But semi-annual dental cleanings are an important part of dental disease prevention and as important as your daily hygiene practice. Here, then, are 3 reasons to keep your twice-a-year dental cleanings right on schedule.

Removing pesky plaque. Just like daily oral hygiene, the main purpose of dental cleanings is to remove disease-causing plaque and its calcified form, tartar. They're necessary because even if you're a brush-and-floss "ninja," you can still leave some plaque behind. These deposits can then harden into tartar, which usually can only be removed with a hygienist's specialized tools and techniques. A professional cleaning ensures your teeth and gums are as free of plaque and tartar as possible.

Identifying "silent" disease. Just because you haven't felt or noticed anything lately doesn't mean your teeth and gums are disease-free. In fact, both tooth decay and gum disease can run "silent" with no noticeable signs on display. But a routine visit often involves x-ray imaging or other diagnostics—not to mention the astute eye of an experienced dental professional—that can identify disease you might not otherwise notice.

Getting a little extra smile pizzazz. Besides causing disease, plaque and tartar can do something else: dull your smile. A thorough dental cleaning not only removes the plaque, but also helps uncover a more attractive smile hiding below the gunk. Hygienists often follow a cleaning with a polishing paste that further boosts your smile's brilliance and beauty.

If it's been a while since your last dental visit, there's no time like the present to get back on track—so make your appointment today. Whether you come alone or have your watchful honey with you, regular dental cleanings will keep your teeth and gums healthy—and your smile bright.

If you would like more information about dental hygiene visits, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Hygiene Visit.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
March 15, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
RemovingTeethCouldAidOrthodonticTreatment

There's usually more to straightening a smile than simply applying braces. That's why an orthodontist takes the time first to learn all they can about a patient's bite and, depending on what they find, take other actions before treating with braces or clear aligners. One such action might be removing one or more teeth.

That might at first seem out of place with our intended goal of straightening teeth. But there are situations where subtracting teeth can benefit bite correction. Here are a few scenarios where a dental extraction might be necessary before orthodontics.

Crowding. When a jaw is failing to grow to a normal width, teeth erupting later may not have sufficient room and thus come in misaligned. It's possible to help widen the jaw during early growth development through a device called a palatal expander, but it's best attempted before puberty. Later, it may be easier to open up more room for tooth movement on a crowded jaw by removing select teeth.

Impacted teeth. Impaction occurs when a tooth doesn't properly erupt and remains totally or partially submerged below the gum line. Although in some situations we may be able to coax an impacted tooth down onto the jaw, it may be easier to extract it, along with the matching tooth on the other side of the jaw for balance. We can then move the teeth or use other restorations to close the gap.

Jaw abnormalities.  A bite problem may in reality be a jaw problem: For example, a lower jaw set too far back may not be aligning properly with the upper jaw causing the bite to skew. Jaw surgery could correct this alignment, but those procedures can be highly invasive. An alternative is to remove a couple of select upper teeth, then use braces to move the remaining teeth back. This can result in a less noticeable overbite.

Orthodontics not only enhances your appearance, it can also a improve your oral health. Extracting one or more teeth may be a necessary prerequisite to straightening your smile.

If you would like more information about straightening a smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removing Teeth for Orthodontic Treatment.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
March 05, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   bridgework  
WithMoreCrownChoicesPatientsCanSaveaToothandTheirSmile

Porcelain crowns are most commonly used to protect and support teeth damaged by disease or trauma. Today's highly advanced crowns are more effective than ever—and more life-like and attractive.

For instance, dentists often install a crown for a tooth that's endured long-term decay. It's often necessary for a dentist to remove significant portions of affected dentin of a decayed tooth over time, which weakens its overall structure. By crowning the tooth, a dentist can both protect it from further decay and provide it structural support. For similar reasons, dentists routinely place crowns after root canal treatments.

To fulfill their role in preserving and strengthening teeth, crowns must be made of durable materials. For this reason, earlier generations of dentists often turned to crowns composed of precious metals like gold or silver, which could withstand daily chewing forces. But these metal crowns did have one downside: Other than shape, they little resembled real teeth.

Crowns later became more life-like around the middle of the 20th Century with the advent of a type of crown composed of a metal shell encased with a tooth-colored porcelain layer. Marrying functionality with aesthetics, these porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns became quite popular and reigned supreme until the early 2000s.

At that time, advances in dental porcelain led to the emergence of the all-ceramic crown. The effort had started a full decade before when dental labs began adding a material called Lucite to porcelain to give it strength. With further improvements, these new porcelain materials, which no longer required metal for durability, soon displaced PFMs as the most commonly installed crown.

Today's dental patient now has more crown choices than patients in previous generations. Especially useful for visible teeth (those in the "Smile Zone"), an all-ceramic crown now enhances rather than detracts from a tooth's appearance. Metal and PFM crowns haven't gone away either—they're often used with teeth that encounter heavy biting forces like molars, and which are not as noticeable.

With more choices, patients no longer need sacrifice their appearance to protect their teeth. You can now preserve a troubled tooth—and still maintain an attractive smile.

If you would like more information on restorative dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
February 23, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
3EmergingTechnologiesThatImproveDentalImplants

Historically speaking, implants are a recent blip on the centuries-long march of dental progress. But few innovations in dentistry can match the impact of implants in its short history on dental function and appearance.

Dental implant therapy has already established itself as a restoration game-changer. But it also continues to improve, thanks to a number of emerging technologies. As a result, implant restorations are far more secure and life-like than ever before.

Here are 3 examples of state-of-the-art technologies that continue to improve this premier dental restoration.

CT/CBCT scanning. Functional and attractive implants depend on precise placement. But various anatomical structures like nerves or sinuses often interfere with placement, so it's important to locate these potential obstructions during the planning phase. To do so, we're increasingly turning to computed tomography (CT). This form of x-ray diagnostics is the assembly of hundreds of images of a jaw location into a three-dimensional model. This gives us a much better view of what lies beneath the gums.

Digital-enhanced planning. Implant success also depends on careful planning. And, it isn't a one-sided affair: The patient's input is just as important as the dentist's expertise. To aid in that process, many dentists are using digital technology to produce a virtual image of a patient's current dental state and what their teeth may look like after dental implants. This type of imaging also allows consideration of a variety of options, including different sized implants and positions, before finalizing the final surgical plan.

Custom surgical guides. To transfer the final plan details to the actual implant procedure, we often create a physical surgical guide placed in the mouth that marks the precise locations for drilling. We can now produce these guides with 3-D printing, a process that uses computer software to produce or "print" a physical object. In this case, the 3-D printer creates a more accurate surgical guide based on the exact contours of a patient's dental arch that's more precise than conventional guides.

Obtaining a dental implant is a highly refined process. And, with the aid of other advances in dental technology, it continues to provide increasing value to patients.

If you would like more information on restoring teeth with dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Technology Aids Dental Implant Therapy.”





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Lisle, IL 60532
(630) 416-8080
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