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Posts for tag: root canal treatment

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
April 24, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
HowaRootCanalCouldSaveYourDiseasedTooth

Just a century ago a heavily decayed tooth was most likely a goner, but that all changed in the early 1900s when various treatments finally coalesced into what we now call root canal therapy. The odds have now flip-flopped—you're more likely to preserve a decayed tooth than to lose it.

By decay, we're not referring only to cavities in a tooth's enamel or outer dentin. That's just the start—decay can quickly spread deeper into the dentin close to the pulp, the central portion of a tooth containing bundles of nerves and blood vessels. It can then move into the tooth's pulp chamber, causing the pulp to die and producing infection that will eventually infect the surrounding supporting bone.

Root canal treatments are often a lifeline to a tooth in this perilous condition. After numbing the tooth and surrounding tissues with local anesthesia, we start the procedure by drilling a tiny hole to access the central pulp and root canals. We then use specialized tools to remove all of the infected tissue within these interior spaces.

After thoroughly disinfecting the tooth of any decay, we shape up the root canals for filling. We then inject a rubbery substance known as gutta percha and completely fill the tooth's resulting empty spaces. This filling helps to prevent a recurrence of infection within the tooth.

Once we've filled the tooth, we seal off the access hole to complete the procedure. You may experience a few days of mild discomfort, but it's usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers. Later, we'll cement a crown over the tooth: This provides additional protection against infection, as well as adds support to the tooth structure.

One more thing! You may have encountered the notion that undergoing a root canal is painful. We're here to dispel that once and for all—dentists take great care to ensure the tooth and the area around it are completely dead to pain. In fact, if you were experiencing a toothache beforehand, a root canal will alleviate the pain.

To get the best treatment outcome for tooth decay, it's important to uncover it as soon as possible. The earlier we begin treatment, the more likely we can bring your tooth back to good health.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
January 24, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
StayonAlertforaDecayRepeatEvenAfteraRootCanal

A deeply decayed tooth is in serious trouble, and something a regular filling may not fix. You may instead need a root canal, a common tooth-saving procedure performed by general dentists or, in more difficult cases, endodontists (specialists in interior tooth treatment).

Regardless of who performs it, though, the basics are the same: The dentist accesses the tooth's decayed interior by drilling a hole and removing diseased tissue from the pulp and root canals through it. They then fill the empty spaces with a rubber-like substance before sealing the tooth and later crowning it to prevent re-infection.

For most, a root canal gives a decayed tooth a new lease on life that can last for years, if not decades. Occasionally, though, a root canaled tooth may become reinfected from tooth decay. There are a number of possible reasons for this unfortunate outcome.

For one, the decay might not have been caught until it had advanced into root canal filling, resulting in contamination. Although root canal treatment may still be effective, the chances of success are much lower than for a decayed tooth diagnosed before it had advanced this far.

Teeth with multiple roots or complex root canal networks are also difficult to treat. The challenge is to ensure all the root canals within the tooth have been thoroughly treated. These types of situations are usually best undertaken by an endodontist with microscopic equipment and advanced techniques that can better infiltrate intricate root canal networks.

These and other situations could make it more likely a root-canaled tooth is reinfected. Depending on the extent of damage, it may be best to extract the tooth and replace it with a dental implant or other restoration. But it's also possible to repeat the root canal—and the second time may be the charm.

As with many other dental conditions, the best outcome regarding a reinfected tooth after root canal is early detection and treatment. You can increase your chances of this with regular dental visits that include monitoring of any root-canaled teeth. You should also see your dentist as soon as possible if you notice pain or gum swelling associated with the tooth.

Root canals are highly effective at saving decayed teeth. But the rare reinfection is possible—so be on the alert.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How Long Will It Last?

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
October 11, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
HerestheScooponYourUpcomingRootCanal

You might be a bit apprehensive if your dentist recommends a root canal treatment, especially if it's your first. That's understandable: Popular culture has portrayed the root canal as an unpleasant experience.

But as a routine dental procedure, root canal treatments have been responsible for saving millions of decayed teeth. And, with local anesthesia, the procedure is painless. In fact, a root canal treatment stops pain that often results from advanced tooth decay.

So, let's take the mystery out of the root canal. Here's the 411 on this vital but often misunderstood dental procedure.

Why the name “root canal”? The terms for the procedure—root canal therapy, root canal treatment or simply “root canal”—arise from one of the principal parts of the tooth involved, root canals. These are tiny passageways that lead from the tooth's innermost layer, the pulp, to the tooth roots. While treatment often focuses on decay or diseased tissue within the pulp, the root canals can be infected too and must be included in the later filling process.

Who can perform a root canal? All general dentists are trained in basic root canal procedures. Depending on your tooth's condition, your family dentist may be able to perform it. But if your tooth has an intricate root canal network or some other complication, you may need an endodontist, a specialist in interior tooth and root treatments. Endodontists can perform advanced root canal techniques and have the specialized equipment to handle intricate cases.

What happens during a root canal? Although details may vary depending on the type of tooth and extent of decay, there's a basic process for all root canal procedures. After numbing the tooth and surrounding tissues, the dentist drills into the tooth to access the inner pulp chamber and root canals, then removes the diseased tissue and disinfects the empty chamber and canals. After preparing the canals, the dentist then fills the empty spaces. This, and subsequent sealing and crowning, protects the tooth from future decay.

After the procedure you may have some minor soreness for a few days, which is usually manageable with mild pain relievers like ibuprofen or acetaminophen. This discomfort will diminish with time, and your tooth will have a new lease on life.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
May 04, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
WhatReallyHappensDuringaRootCanalTreatment

Bad news at your last dental visit: You have a decayed tooth. And not just in the enamel—the decay has invaded the tooth's inner pulp and the resulting infection is threatening the supporting bone structure.

You're thinking that tooth is toast. Then comes the good news: your dentist believes the tooth can be rescued with a root canal treatment.

But then you begin thinking about how often Uncle Sid says he'd rather undergo a colonoscopy than have a root canal. Is the procedure really as painful and uncomfortable as popular culture says it is? What is a root canal really like?

First step: Things go numb. Uncle Sid is wrong: A root canal treatment is painless because your dentist will first make sure the entire area involving the tooth is anesthetized. This does involve injecting the local anesthetic deep within the tissues, but you won't even feel the needle prick thanks to topical anesthesia applied to the surface gums.

Second step: Drilling deep. After applying a protective dam to isolate the infected tooth from its neighbors, your dentist will drill a small access hole through the enamel and dentin to reach the pulp and root canals. If it's one of the larger back teeth, the access hole is usually drilled in the tooth's biting surface; in a front tooth, the hole is usually located on the tongue side.

Third Step: Removing diseased tissue. Using special instruments, your dentist will remove the diseased tissue in the pulp and root canals, essentially stopping the infection and any tooth pain you've been experiencing. The empty pulp chamber and canals are often then disinfected with a special antibacterial solution.

Fourth Step: Protecting the tooth. After some shaping, the pulp chamber and root canals are filled with a special filling to prevent further infection. The access hole is then filled and sealed to complete the procedure. At some point in the future, the tooth typically will need a crown to add support and further protection.

You may have some minor discomfort afterward, but this can usually be managed with a mild pain reliever like ibuprofen or acetaminophen. After a week or so, you'll be good as new—and so will your tooth.

If you would like more information on root canal therapy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
January 28, 2020
Category: Oral Health

Root canal therapy could preserve your natural smile and prevent extractions.

A root canal is one of the most common procedures that our Lisle, IL, dentist Dr. Meda Naga performs. A root canal is usually recommended when the dental pulp is inflamed or infected. The dental pulp is the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains connective tissue, nerves and blood vessels. Once decay, bacteria or traumatic injury has affected the health of the pulp the only way to save the tooth is to remove the pulp.

When is a root canal needed?

Even though the dental pulp is hidden beneath the hard protective layers of the tooth this structure can still become damaged. If decay damages the outer layers this can allow bacteria to get inside the tooth and affect the pulp. Furthermore, an infection or injury to the tooth can also damage the pulp. The only way for our Lisle, IL, dentist to preserve the tooth is by removing the dental pulp and sealing the root canals to prevent future infections.

How do I know that I need a root canal?

The unfortunate part is that you may not know that you need a root canal. That’s because symptoms don’t usually appear until much later, which means that you could have an infected or inflamed dental pulp but not know until the problem has become more advanced.

So, how are you supposed to know when a problem is occurring? Simple. You need to visit your dentist every six months for checkups. Just because you aren’t experiencing symptoms doesn’t mean that you don’t have a problem. Our dental team can pinpoint even the subtlest changes that could indicate an affected dental pulp. This is why routine cleanings should never be missed, no matter how healthy your smile might seem.

Of course, you should also schedule an immediate appointment with us if you experience,

  • A severe and persistent toothache
  • Dental pain that gets worse when biting down, chewing or putting pressure on the tooth
  • Sudden, lingering tooth sensitivity
  • Swollen, tender gums around the tooth
  • Darkening of the tooth
  • An abscess, a pimple-like bump that develops on the gums (a sign of infection)

Meda Dental has offices in Lisle and Naperville, IL, to make getting the immediate dental care you need even easier. Call us today at (630) 416-8080 or (630) 352-4141 if you need to schedule a routine cleaning or if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above.



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Meda Dental

Family Dentist in Lisle, IL
Meda Dental
2801 East Ogden Avenue
Lisle, IL 60532
(630) 416-8080
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Family Dentist in Naperville, IL
Meda Dental
2735 Hassert Blvd, Unit #159
Naperville, IL 60564
(630) 352-4141
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