My Blog

Posts for: May, 2022

By Sathya Medanaga, D.D.S.
May 24, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces  
3WaysToGetAheadofYourChildsDevelopingBiteProblem

Each year some 4 million teens and pre-teens have their teeth straightened with braces or clear aligners. But there's another facet of bite correction that can take place much earlier in a child's life—and which might reduce or eliminate orthodontic treatment later.

Techniques known as interceptive orthodontics do exactly what the name implies—get ahead of bite problems before they fully develop. Many of these treatments attempt to influence jaw development, a prime factor in many bite problems. Although braces may be a part of interceptive treatment, it often includes other devices.

Here are 3 examples of interventional treatments that can stop a growing bite problem in its tracks.

Palatal expanders. Sometimes, an upper jaw may be growing too narrowly. As a result, incoming permanent teeth don't have enough space and can erupt out of position. A palatal expander device, usually installed around age 7 against the roof of the mouth, puts pressure on the side teeth to "push" the jaw outward. This widens a gap in the center of the pallet, which then fills with new bone. By the time the gap closes in early adolescence, the jaw has gained width and more room for incoming teeth.

Herbst appliances. Supporting muscles and bones can pressure the upper jaw to grow too far forward, which in turn creates an overbite where the upper teeth severely overlap the lower. An orthodontist may attach a Herbst appliance, a device consisting of two metal hinges, to the upper and lower jaws toward the back of the mouth. The hinge action forces the jaw muscles and bones to move the lower jaw forward as it grows, resulting in a better relationship with the upper jaw.

Space maintainers. Not all interceptive techniques involve intricate appliances—a simple looped wire could prevent a later bite problem. Because primary (baby) teeth hold the spaces for future permanent teeth, losing one too early could create an empty space into which surrounding teeth can drift. This, then, reduces the space available for the incoming tooth, causing it to erupt out of position. Placing a looped wire called a space maintainer into the space prevents the teeth around the gap from moving into it.

If you would like more information on various orthodontic treatments, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Interceptive Orthodontics.”


ThisTemporaryRPDCouldSustainYourSmileWhileYouWaitForImplants

Dental implants are often the ideal choice to replace missing teeth. Unfortunately, "ideal" and "affordable" don't always align simultaneously for people. Even if implants are right for you, you may have to put them off to a more financially appropriate season.

In the meantime, though, you're still missing teeth—and perhaps some of them are right square in the middle of your smile. What can you do now, even if temporarily?

The solution might be a flexible removable partial denture (RPD). These newer types of RPD fit somewhere between the lightweight "flipper" and the more traditional rigid plastic appliances often made for permanent use. The flexible RPD is made of nylon plastic (technically known as a super-polyamide), which although lightweight, is highly durable.

Super-polyamides change their shape under high heat, a characteristic dental technicians take advantage of by injection molding heated material into flexible denture bases, to which they then attach the replacement teeth. Like other RPDs, a flexible RPD is custom-designed for the individual patient to match their jaw contours, as well as the types and locations of their missing teeth.

Flexible RPDs also differ from other RPD types in how they stay in place. While the more rigid RPD depends on metal clasps that grip to some of the remaining natural teeth, a flexible RPD uses finger-like extensions of the nylon material to fit around teeth near the gum line where they're difficult to see. As such, the flexible RPD is both comfortable and securely held in place.

A flexible RPD, like their counterparts, does require regular maintenance. Any RPD can accumulate dental plaque, a thin biofilm buildup on teeth that causes dental disease. For this reason, wearers should regularly remove their RPD and clean it thoroughly with an antibacterial soap (never toothpaste). All RPDs should also be removed at night to limit bacterial growth.

With a little care, a flexible RPD could last for several years. It could be just the solution to buy you time while you're waiting to obtain dental implants.

If you would like more information on restoration options for missing teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flexible Partial Dentures.”


VictoriaBeckhamsToothsomeCollection-AllofHerChildrensBabyTeeth

In one respect, celebrities are no different from the rest of us—quite a few famous people love to collect things. Marie Osmond collects dolls (as well as Johnny Depp, reportedly); Leonardo DiCaprio, vintage toys. And, of course, Jay Leno has his famous fleet of cars. But Victoria Beckham's collection is unusually "familial"—she's kept all of her four children's "baby" teeth after they've fallen out.

Best known as Posh Spice of the 1990s group Spice Girls and now a fashion designer and TV personality, Beckham told People Magazine that she has an "entire bucket" of her kids' primary teeth. And, she recently added to it when her nine-year old daughter lost another tooth earlier this year.

You may or may not want to keep your child's baby teeth, but you'll certainly have the opportunity. Children start losing their first set of teeth around age 6 or 7 through early puberty. During the process, each tooth's roots and gum attachment weakens to the point that the tooth becomes noticeably loose. Not long after, it gives way and falls out.

Although a baby tooth doesn't normally need any help with this, children (and sometimes parents) are often eager to accelerate the process. A loose tooth can be annoying—plus there's often a financial incentive via the "Tooth Fairy!"

First off, there's not much harm in a child wiggling a loose tooth—it may even help it come out. It's also possible to help the tooth safely detach sooner by taking a small piece of tissue, folding it over the tooth and giving it a gentle downward squeeze. If it's loose enough, it should pop out.

If it doesn't, don't resort to more forcible measures like the proverbial string and a door—just wait a day or two before trying the gentle squeeze method again. Once the tooth comes out, the empty socket may bleed a bit or not at all. If heavy bleeding does occur, have the child bite down on a piece of clean gauze or a wet tea bag until it stops. You may also have them eat softer foods for a few days to avoid a resumption of bleeding.

Beyond that, there's little else to do but place it under your child's pillow for the Tooth Fairy. And if after their "exchange" with that famous member of the Fae Folk you find yourself in possession of the erstwhile tooth, consider taking a cue from Victoria Beckham and add it to your own collection of family memories.

If you would like more information about losing baby teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Importance of Baby Teeth.”




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